Castle Clock Teaching

Clock_of_al_Jazari_before_1206

 

For my Fall 2013 simulation class, I decided to try something a bit different than the usual verbal onslaught of modeling methodology with mathematics and scattered applications. We used a type of learning that is most commonly known as object-based learning, and frequently practiced in museums such as the one in University College London (UCL). An object is chosen as the focal point of collaborative discovery. So, we chose al Jazari's 13th century water clock which goes by "Castle Clock" because of its original physical location. Al Jazari was one of history's great masters of mechanical invention. The clock is an astronomical computer, like all time pieces. This turned out to be a fun and useful learning experiment but it had its challenges as well. The issue is that the academy (which is to say most places of formal learning) is splintered into multiple disciplines. So, while the students in the class had a roller coaster ride through history, culture, systems dynamics, computer science, physics, language, and mathematics, this approach runs counter to how we normally teach students, and how students and faculty get credit for their work. My gut feeling is that as the academy evolves, this mode of learning will become more common and the credit and disciplinary issues will evolve with it. At UTD, we are making inroads here and things look quite positive.