Computer Science & History

Racknitz_-_The_Turk_3-colour-540

Artificial Intelligence (AI) isn't a new phenomenon. For that matter much of what we value in the way of formalism in Computer Science, isn't new either since computers were analog (and human) before they were digital. Abstract concepts such as memory, state, event, iteration, and branching are ubiquitous in the real world. One exploring these concepts should not have to stare at a computer screen to learn them.  The concepts are larger in scope than found in digital technologies. Jessica Riskin wrote a nice historical piece entitled Frolicsome Engines on the history of AI through mechanical automata, . In Computer Science (CS) we tend to be historically, if not culturally, illiterate. There are many issues at play here, with the main issue being that within Engineering, there are few electives since the goal is to educate students for specific skill sets. Maybe topics such as philosophy and history are tangential to CS? The core skill sets, theoretical or practical, stem from early mathematical research in the 1930s. Before the 1930s, I suppose we tend to think of the history of computing as non-existent. Do other areas in science or the liberal arts such as mathematics, physics, and chemistry suffer the same fate of removing history from their curricula? Do math teachers not talk of history when covering geometry, algebra, and calculus? I don't have a good answer to that, but I do need to start digging for answers.